Spinoza and Proportion Conference – Speakers announced

Spinoza and Proportion

A conference of the AHRC Equalities of Wellbeing project

5-6 May 2015, University of Aberdeen, Scotland

This conference will explore different aspects of proportion in Spinoza’s philosophy. We are delighted to announce our list of speakers. Please follow the blog by email to receive updates.

Spinoza and Proportion provisional programme now available.

Speakers:

Simon Duffy (Yale-NUS College, Singapore): “Proportion as a barometer of the affective life in Spinoza”

Helene Frichot (Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm): “Slownesses and Speeds, Latitudes and Longitudes: In the Vicinity of Beatitude”

Gokhan Kodalak (Cornell University): “Spinoza, affective architecture, and proportionate power”

Mike LeBuffe (University of Otago): “The place of body in Spinoza’s metaphysics” (by Skype)

Beth Lord (University of Aberdeen): “Spinoza’s ratios and relational autonomy”

Heidi Ravven (Hamilton College): “Ratio and activity: Spinoza’s biologizing of the mind in an Aristotelian key” (by Skype)

Peg Rawes (University College London): “Dissimiliarity: Spinoza’s geometric ratios and housing crises”

Anthony Uhlmann (University of Western Sydney): “‘The eyes of the mind’: ratio and art in Spinoza and Swift”

Valtteri Viljanen (University of Turku): “Spinoza’s ontology geometrically illustrated: a reading of Ethics 2P8S”

Stefan White (Manchester Metropolitan University): “The greater part: how intuition makes a better world”

Timothy Yenter (University of Mississippi): “Harmony in Spinoza and his critics”

Eventbrite - Spinoza and Proportion Conference

Organization: Beth Lord s.b.lord@abdn.ac.uk

‘Measuring Happiness?’–A Panel Discussion at the LSE.

Last night saw a transdisciplinary panel of Economists, Neuroscientists, Behavioural Scientists and industry specialists, all debating the possibility and social benefits of measuring happiness and wellbeing.

With discussion ranging from what makes individuals happy, similarity in happiness patterns between the great apes and human beings, and the difference between moment to moment happiness and what we think should make us happy, the dialogue was far reaching and raised many questions regarding wellbeing and the individual, as well as the wider undertaking of measuring the happiness of a nation.

With few certain agreements, the panel were unanimous in distinguishing between a nations’ wellbeing and its GDP meaning that the question of ‘happiness’ is at the fore of political and public concern in our present era of austerity.

Thinking through Spinoza symposium (2)

I presented a paper on Equality in Spinoza’s Theologico-Political Treatise, and Peg presented a paper on Spinoza’s Geometric Ecologies, at this symposium at Queen Mary University of London last week (24 May). It was useful to hear one another’s recent research and think about the directions our work might take in the project. We also had our first opportunity to present the project to a Spinoza audience.

It was a terrific conference, with papers from Moira Gatens, Rosi Braidotti, Filippo del Lucchese, and Simon O’Sullivan. Thanks to Caroline Williams for organizing such an interesting event.

Online link to Beth Lord’s paper, “What does Spinoza mean by Equality in the Theologico-Political Treatise?”